Dried Flowers

Dried Flowers

Like how you put flowers up to wilt, I hang my feelings up to dry

Preserved beauty with no life, it crumbles as time dances by

To dust it dissolves, just like our love after we said goodbye 

Giovanna Fletcher Book Event

Giovanna Fletcher celebrated the release of her latest novel, Always With Love, with a book event at Waterstones Trafalgar Square.

Always With Love is the sequel to best-selling author Giovanna’s debut novel, Billy and Me. It tells of the new much-anticipated chapter to Billy and Sophie’s romance.

As one not to miss a signing event of an awesome author, I let my friend drag me to it.

Giovanna Fletcher – Always With Love | 2 June 2016, Waterstones Trafalgar Square

The prettiest Waterstones

Well, was…
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Inside Waterstones New Street in Birmingham

It came to me as a sad sad news that the most beautiful Waterstones I’ve ever been to has closed down. It may be my favourite Waterstones, with all its grandeur found in the high ceilings, grand staircase and mezzanine – which provided a great view of the store and the shelves below. (Although, Waterstones Piccadilly is a close competition being the biggest bookstore in Europe and all)

I’ve heard the news about it closing down but it was still heart-breaking to see the blacked-out windows and scaffoldings around the building during my recent visit to Birmingham. No more are those hours of browsing in this 20 000 sq ft of book heaven.

I mean look at this all this!wns Continue reading “The prettiest Waterstones”

What is it about YA books: A look at its popularity and fandoms

I have a profound love affair with the Young Adult genre. This is something that I am proud to admit and also something I cannot deny since, as you will find, my fondness for YA has leaked into my work. The following article is a piece I’ve written for an assessment when I was at university. As they say, “write what you know” or “write what you love.” Well, why not both?

WHAT IS IT ABOUT YA BOOKS: A LOOK AT ITS POPULARITY AND FANDOMS
First published on 16 July 2014 on Where Words Fly.

Over a decade into the boom in Young Adult Literature and 2014 looks like it is still yet the year that the Young Adult genre is going to be cemented as a true force.

There were 30 000 Young Adult titles published in 2009, which is a massive increase from the 3 000 titles in 1997. In the same year, publishing companies’ total sales for YA exceeded $3 billion and it has been publishers’ favourite bet ever since. To add, according to an artice in The LA Times, more than a dozen publishers has launched young adult imprints. And finally, with websites such as Epicreads releasing lists of “The 15 Most Anticipated YA Books Coming” every month since September in 2013 to date, it is evident that YA popularity is as strong as ever if not growing even stronger.

The genre mainly targeted at teenagers has become so popular in the past years that it has been recognized as a separate genre from Children’s and stores and libraries started having entire separate sections with rows of shelves entirely dedicated to YA. Continue reading “What is it about YA books: A look at its popularity and fandoms”

Not That Kind Of Girl: A young woman tells you what she’s “learned” by Lena Dunham | Book Review

Not That Kind Of Girl Book Cover
Vulgar, candid, absolutely hilarious and grippingly dark at times pretty much sums up Not That Kind Of Girl. In her memoir, Lena ‘voice of her generation’ Dunham imparts wit and cultural  significance.

Famous for being the creator and star of HBO’s comedy series, Girls, Lena Dunham declares in one of her chapters, “performing in sex scenes that I direct, exposing a flash of my weird puffy nipple, those things don’t fall into my zone of terror.” So is self-exposing her whole being (well, at least 28 years of it) in a book, it seems.

Continue reading “Not That Kind Of Girl: A young woman tells you what she’s “learned” by Lena Dunham | Book Review”

Unspoken by Sarah Rees Brennan | Book Review

Unspoken, the first book of The Lynburn Legacy Series, is a book not to be read at night or in the very early hours of the morning. (Yep. I stayed overnight until the break of dawn reading this.) This is a lesson I learned the hard way. Or maybe, I’m just faint-hearted. ‘Sassy gothic’ is the term used by the author to describe this, which cannot be more spot-on. Romance. Check! Horror. CHECK!  (But then again, I’m easy to scare.) Sassiness? Oh yeah… overflowing in every shape and form.

Unspoken tells of Kami Glass, a female protagonist who can defenestrate her own thugs. What can I say? She totally kick ass and quite literally as well because she knows handy self-defense moves. She’s an aspiring journalist who just successfully set up a school paper. With that comes along her strong nose for stories and incurable and sometimes dangerously placed nosiness too. You can easily rule her out as ordinary (and also awesome, of course) if not for her ‘friend’. This friend exists in the name of Jared and only in her head (have no mistake, she’s still awesome). She’s been talking to this ‘imaginary’ friend all her life – from shared lullabies to puberty tantrums. It is both a connection which became her source of strength and comfort and the cause of her estrangement from the rest of her tiny placid ordinary[1] town. Laughing at nothing and staring at empty space while she’s lost in her head are the norms for Kami until Jared turns out to be corporeal and volunteers to throw thugs out windows for her.

Jared is real and incredibly tall and incredibly handsome and incredibly getting on Kami’s nerves. Just like Kami and the author, Sarah, I have no real objections to handsome princes… so, I’m all in for that! However, Kami’s bewildered. All her life she thought she’s mental but now here’s a deal breaker for her craziness or has she only became even crazier? The story continues to unfold as Kami deals with this big revelation. While that’s happening it’s not like everything else around her is helping as a bigger and more sinister reveal is brewing.

Continue reading “Unspoken by Sarah Rees Brennan | Book Review”